What are you doing to contribute toward building peace in your family, community, workplace, the world?

Today is International Day of Peace (“Peace Day“) a day that is observed around the world on September 21st. It was established by a United Nations resolution in 1981 “as a shared date for all humanity to commit to Peace above all differences and to contribute to building a Culture of Peace.”

You may be thinking “how can I contribute to building peace in the world?” How can I really make a difference?

I believe that we all have a role to play in helping build peace in the world, and that each and every one of us CAN make a difference.

Building peace starts from the inside out. When we find inner peace and model it for others, we then help build peace in our families, our communities, our workplaces … the world.

What do I mean by peace?

I’d like to share a poem that for me describes inner peace (source unknown).

“Peace.

It does not mean to be in a place

where there is no noise, trouble

or hard work.

It means to be in the midst of

these things and still be calm

in your heart.”

What do you do to find inner peace?

Here are a few proven strategies and powerful practices that I use to help stay calm, focused and grounded.

Starting the day off right:

  • Rather than leaping out of bed and “hitting the ground running” make a conscious effort to quiet your mind and scan your body from the top of your head to the tips of your toes. Notice any tension or discomfort; breathe into these areas and consciously release and let of the tension.
  • Do some conscious stretching. I incorporate some yoga stretches with crunches to awaken my body before I do anything else. Mindfully massaging different joints of your body from head to toe is also meditative.
  • Meditate for 10 to 20 minutes. There are a number of digital products available to help you do this. I have found Deepak and Oprah’s 21-day meditation experiences helpful as they focus on a key theme, and each day, break down the theme. In addition, beautiful nature sounds and music play in the background to assist you in relaxing and staying focused.
  • Ground yourself. Being centered and grounded helps you to be more responsive rather than reactive when interacting with others. “For example, with our family members, when we are centered, grounded and at peace we truly focus on each individual and connect with them at the heart level. They then feel listened to, understood, accepted, and loved. Likewise in the workplace if a colleague gets upset or angry we can show empathy and understanding rather than reacting to them with frustration or as if they are a threat.”[1]

Here is a tool I have found extremely useful in helping me to get centered and grounded. I do this exercise at the start of every day and also before I head into an important meeting or go “on stage” for a speaking event. I go somewhere quiet (depending on the venue it may be a washroom stall), then close my eyes and take several deep breaths to get into my body. I imagine I have roots growing out of the bottom of my feet going deep down into the earth. Then I imagine drawing the earth’s energy coming up through my feet, legs and into my heart. I then imagine I have branches reaching up to the sky to access the universal or source energy (or whatever you wish to call it) and feel that energy coming down through my head and neck and into my heart. I imagine that I am grounded to the earth and to the sky. This enables me to be much more powerful in the work I do and to be less reactive and more responsive in my interactions with others at work or at home.

Throughout the Day:

  • Spend regular time in nature – Being in nature is therapeutic. Walking among trees (e.g. in parks and forests) releases stress in our bodies. After several decades of research, the Japanese have demonstrated that walking among trees decreases our heart rate, our blood pressure and increases the number of natural killer cells our body produces. Being in on or by water clears our energy field and helps ground us.  
  • Be grateful for what you have. On awakening or at the end of the day write down 3 to 5 things you are grateful for. There is mounting evidence on the benefits of gratitude:

“With gratitude, people acknowledge the goodness in their lives.

In the process, people usually recognize that the source of that goodness

lies at least partially outside themselves. As a result, gratitude also

helps people connect to something larger than themselves

as individuals — whether to other people, nature, or a higher power.”[2]

For additional tools to support you to find inner peace and also to help build peace in your family, community, workplace … the world, check out my book “Learning to Dance with Life” that is underpinned by evidence from neuroscience, eastern psychology and the health-promoting and healing benefits of the arts.

I’d love to hear what tools you use to start your days off right, and to find peace amidst the chaos of daily life and work. I invite you to share your thoughts and experiences below.

Here’s to helping build peace in the world one person at a time!


[1] Thompson, Pamela, Learning to Dance with Life: A Guide for High Achieving Women, p. 144

[2] https://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/giving-thanks-can-make-you-happier

nunc venenatis sit eleifend massa elementum pulvinar
Share This